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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 37
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English 37
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
taken to the streets? to discuss this i'm joined by ian beg who is a research fellow at the london school of economics. so professor beg, we hear talk this being the worst recession since the second world war. is it? >> it's been a long recession and it's very slow to see any kind of recovery. but it's also worth remembering statistically although being one of the worst in the last century, we actually today are as well off as in 2006. we've only gone back by a few steps. >> is it simply a case that it feels like the worst recession that anyone can remember? >> it's the fact that it hasn't gone to a recovery phase. tore used to in a recession have a deep downturn followed bay quite rapid recovery. it takes longer to readdress individual positions in their debt. and that means that it lasts much longer than everybody expects because everybody tries to save. >> so if things aren't very bleak across europe, why is it that in some countries as in greece and in spain we've seen the protest? >> i put greece out on its own because the magnitude of the downturn in greece has been phenomena
's the only way that you can get an international agreement. -- can't do it by begging the kyoto protocol approach was to beg. beg all the other countries to pick some target and then reach that target without any -- and, of course, even though many countries agreed like canada, they soon abandon it -- when it's not convenient, they abandon it -- you have to -- the only way you can enforce it is with the price, and that -- so that could be done. and, you know, i was in china and the china -- chinese leaders understand this. they don't deny their climate problem. they are engineers and they're rationale, and they don't want to be addicted to fossil fuels the way the united states is and have to protect the supply line around the world, so they are, number one in solar panels, wind power and nuclear power, building thirty nuclear power plants. so i don't -- but, of course, they do have a major problem with so many people in poverty and they're -- and they need -- they know they need to get them out of poverty or they may -- their government may not survive. so the -- of course, they're doin
. >> here. >> present. >> i beg your pardon, mr. elector. >> present. >> here. >> present. >> present. >> present. >> present. >> present. >> present. >> mr. secretary, all electoral members are present. >> i ask maureen o'connor, chief justice of the ohio supreme court, to come forward and administer the oath of office to the members of this electoral college. >> thank you, and, of course, i asked you to stand and raise your right hand. if you will repeat after me -- i -- please state your name -- do solemnly swear that i will support, obey, and to defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution and laws of the state of ohio and that i will faithfully discharge the duties of my office as i shall answer unto god. congratulations. >> thank you. i will now entertain nominations for the chairman of the 53rd ohio electoral college. i will now call on the gentleman. >> mr. secretary, i nominate chris redfern. >> are there any other nominations? >> i move that nominations for chairman be closed. >> it has been moved that nominations for the chairman be closed. is there a s
the president one is because he promised guests to all of these different groups. i think black people would beg to differ with mr. romney on that. i do not think he has ever given -- president obama has never given blacks gifts. i think that was the wrong choice of words. the reason why republicans were out raise this because, once again, mitt romney shows he is out of touch and uses in delicate language. ifts.s not gues president obama exploited different demographic groups. to his own benefit. the amnesty for latinos and hispanics, he did an executive order and said, if you are under 30 and have been in this country for five years, you can have a pass for staying here. he stopped calling it citizenship. we will give you amnesty. you will stay here. you went through all of the litany of things. here is where romney felt. he did not even bother to talk to the groups. besides one speech, which i think what a great starting point to a real relationship with black americans because mitt romney actually said, here is what i will promise you -- school choice and education, of entrepreneurship. there
that need to be carried out. we very much agree with the impetus of your question. >> it begs the question of why did that happen? obviously a lot of time is a factor. clearly no specific follow-up overtime. one of the major recommendations was a bill the plan, which fell off from 10 buildings to three, tied to budget constraints. so i think it was a combination of factors. while 1999 is certainly close to this decade, the world has changed dramatically. risks associated with that world are -- we are in a much more difficult and challenging position with respect to meeting the needs to be out there and is engaged in doing so in a way that our people are very specifically secure. >> there is a specific recommendation for a 10-year program at a specific level of funding specifically to meet the point that admiral mullen made that the building program has fallen off any took about to the original target. >> your report was extremely critical of the performance of some individuals and the diplomatic security, but these pierrots do not exist in a vacuum. they are part of a hierarchical organiza
are nodding your head about that. guest: i beg to differ with you on that. they are part of my task force which meets every other week with about 40 other professionals from schools and psychologists. we work on the different issues. host: what is their mission? guest: to work on the mental health issue. they did not exert as much of their influence where they could or should. i think that is a stigma and that they are not as well organized in outreach and be able to get out to the different areas that are needed. i know them very well and they are wonderful people. there are wonderful organizations that need to work with them. they are effective. we need to work at the local levels at the schools, where children were working at the -- they can begin to spot some of these disorders and talk to the parents and to try to solve them at the early ages. that is one thing that one group does. they provide grants and scholarships to put on site clinicians to help these youngsters, educate the teachers and work with the families to get to the bottom of what eails a child. guest: we need to rethin
of the land. lan but also begs the question of, do you want to spend your time trying to do the things it did not release him to pay off much in the last election? >> jason dick, emily goodin, thank you for being on "newsmakers." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we will show our conversation with luke messer today again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. coast chambers of congress are in -- both chambers of congress are in. the senate is in at 1:00 eastern time. votes are scheduled at 2:00 p.m. eastern. majority leader harry reid and minority leader mcconnell had set a deadline of 3:00 p.m. when they're planning to convene a caucus meetings and update members of the parties on a possible plan for taxes and spending on the new year. will bring you live coverage of the senate on c-span2 started at 1:00 eastern. in the house, the return of 2:00 p.m. you'll be considering a number of pieces of legislation. what the live coverage of the house here and c-span. next, retiring senator kent conrad reflects on his career in congress
, is begging for money. -- that great project, is begging for money. this is the sort of thing that ought to be supported by the u.s. government. the final thing we need to do in terms of non state actors, al qaeda came closest to developing wmd when they were in control of territory in afghanistan. we have to keep groups like that from getting a base. >> chemical, i wonder if you could talk a little bit about nuclear terrorism. >> again, i am a scientist. i think it is a very small probability. i reject the idea of 1% or 50%. the chance of fukushima happening was less than 1%. it is a low probability, but a horrific consequences. i think if proliferation happens, as nuclear capabilities bread, you'll have more of the wherewithal for terrorists to exploit and therefore more opportunities. i would like to emphasize what was said, you have to deny the territory. that is the lesson in afghanistan. you don't want to give these people time and space to work on these kind of weapons. with that being said, if you look at sudan, somalia, a couple of places, is not an easy thing to accomplish. and
believe it is the way to proceed not to give up on high-speed rail. i beg you not to get up. -- giv eup. e up. if you continue to flake this money out, it in the end there will be huge criticism of the administration for having nothing to show for a bond. above is a possible for you to think you're a fiscal priority based on a real time vision of what lies ahead for us in the next five years so that we might prioritized among these projects which for example have state go ahead. the projects were you see an opportunity for private sector funding. on some rational basis, we're going to get to everybody. they are prioritizing where the money goes furs. our priority now. we are not afraid to say what it is. >> of course we will. we will. >> i will take that answer right there. thank you. >> let me yield now to the gentleman from indiana. >> i'm going to quickly draw your attention to a matter unrelated to high-speed rail. >> a fine. >> indiana recently received notice that indiana was no longer in compliance with open container and repeat offender law. we disagree with that. there recently to
no, i'm not. he took to begging. he asked, cajoled, he asked for 50 destroyers. f.d.r. dragged his feet. first he said no. then he said maybe. then by november of 1940 the first five or six of the 50 dribbled in. they were rust buckets and virtually obsolete. which roosevelt told t"new york times" and congress. he said we gave them junk and we get six or seven caribbean naval bases from the empire. at one point that summer i believe churchill wrote a letter and asked roosevelt to declare war. that is how desperate he was. and so after a few brandies in t the co vilville diaries churchi says they want to us bleed to death and pick up everything that is left for free. at one point they were thinking around the dipper table of having everyone in england melt their wedding rings because it might raise $8 million or $10 million of gold and use that to buy american goods because it was all cash and carry, to shame the americans. they didn't do that. host: how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? guest: one of the things, in doing this, i had to lock at what is he
many times did he ask fdr to get into the war? clacks out one -- >> at one point, he took to begging. he asked for destroyers. fdr said no. then he said maybe. then the first five or six dribbled in. they were rustbuckets. he told congress -- more last -- look at the deal i just made. we gave them drunk. at one point that summer, churchill i asked roosevelt to declare war. he was desperate. and so after a few brandies, and you will see churchill's saying "those americans are not good americans. they want us to bleed to death and come in and pick up everything for free." at one. he talked about having everyone in england mill there wedding rings to raise $10 million worth of gold to buy american goods. to shame the americans. they did not do that. >> how much did winston churchill expect japan to get into the war? >> one of the things in doing this, i had to look at what is he interested in? what is in his head? he was interested in norway, sumatra, not japan, not the pacific. his knowledge of geography, the politics, the military situation was not there. he admits in his memoirs in o
have time for another question? >> i beg your pardon? >> i yield back my time. >> the committee recognizes chairman smith. >> let me address my first question to you. it shows there is not much supports and the scientific and space committee for a near- earth astroid in 2025. is this helpful in getting us to mars? are there alternative missions that can replace that mission? >> there's a mission to an asteroid that is in the 2010 national space policy of the u.s. in addition to not having been widely accepted, there were some shortcomings noted. as we look back in time, and there have been several presidents that have talked about mars. the rhetoric toward that was noted by the committee. there are different paths that one could go if that was the chosen destination for a human mission. it will maybe look at integrating some of the other aspects of nasa's work. for example, if that was the strategic goal then you will look at the robotic missions that would support going there. >> the do you think we should reconsider that mission to the near-earth asteroid? >> the committee did
about that. i would beg you to go back to the fda and say let's get with it. there may be other causes. but let's get mercury out of vaccinations which is a contributing factor. if you do that and go to a single shot of violence, it will not cause anything. please go back and work on it. >> we now recognized the gentle lady. [applause] from the district of columbia. ms. norton. >> thank you. >> i apologize. the gentle lady is right. do either of you have a response? i realize it will not imposed question. if either of you want to make a comment on the video, it will be in part of the record. >> i would be happy to make comment about the vaccine themselves. since 2001, it has been removed from vaccines given to children with the exception of -- >> we said the record will remain open for all, after you will have an opportunity to voice yourself. please, dr. . >> with the exception of the multi vial flu vaccine. >> thank you. the gentle lady may begin. >> i have a couple of questions. it would probably be the case that many of these children who may have some features of autism were not r
of the investments they made, the ridership has increased which then begs for more investments at different speeds. how was that factored into your analysis about whether there is an efficiency in investing? >> we are still assessing the california process for developing writer ship -- ridership and revenue forecast. the inspector general has put in i skied out there. -- nice guide out there. it is an extremely complex undertaking. that being said, it is critical in determining the viability of our products. the key to this is you have to continually we find the estimate at the project scope, as things change. update the model and make sure you have the state of the art, if you will. that is the process california is undertaking as well. >> thank you. meat turned to mr. edward hamberger/ i at express concern -- let me turn to edward hamberger. i wonder if the freight industry has done some assessment about what that means in terms of its own productivity, competitiveness. i hear the concern the secretary expressed that we have a great freight system. it is private, has great investment. we do not
beg to differ with her because we have been without a doctor -- my husband is on medicare and i am still paying for an individual policy. we have been without a doctor since back in june and our group practice has told us they cannot get a doctor. the doctors that are coming out on the going into general practice or internal medicine because of the medicare situation, that they are going where they can make more money. we are still without a doctor. host: what are you doing? caller: they will give us a flu shot or whatever but as for having a doctor that new our routine and would be able to -- that we would feel comfortable with, we are waiting for one to have on staff. we go to the doctors in orange county. it is a university of virginia practice out of charlottesville. we normally have always gone to those doctors and they treat and a lot of elderly. host: if you have a life situation, what do you do right now? guestcaller: we have to see whor is on staff there that is still there as far as any kind of situation. my husband just had shingles and he was being treated for that. the
that is speaking, i beg to defer with her because we have been without a doctor -- my husband is on medicare. i'm paying for an individual policy but we've been without a doctor since june, she moved. our group practice told us they can't get a doctor. that the doctors are coming out at the university or wherever they are not going into general practice and internal medicine because of the medicare situation. they are going where they can make more money. so we're still without a doctor, here it is december. >> what are you doing? >> an on staff sees us if we need a flu shot or whatever. as for having a doctor who knew our routine and someone we would feel comfortable with we're waiting for them to have one on staff. >> where is rochelle, virginia? >> we go to the county that is nearest to us. it is a university of virginia practice out of charlottesville. we normally always go to those doctors and they treat mostly elderly. >> iris, if you have have a life situation or need to see a fission for, anything beyond a flu shot, what do you do right now? >> that's what i said. we have to see whoever
that is speaking, sarah kliff, i beg to differ with her because we have been without a doctor -- my husband is on medicare and i am still paying for an individual policy. we have been without a doctor since back in june and our group practice has told us they cannot get a doctor. the doctors that are coming out on the going into general practice or internal medicine because of the medicare situation, that they are going where they can make more money. we are still without a doctor. host: what are you doing? caller: they will give us a flu shot or whatever but as for having a doctor that new our routine and would be able to -- that we would feel comfortable with, we are waiting for one to have on staff. we go to the doctors in orange county. it is a university of virginia practice out of charlottesville. we normally have always gone to those doctors, and they treat a lot of elderly. host: if you have a life situation, what do you do right now? caller: we have to see whoever is on staff there that is still there as far as any kind of situation. my husband just had shingles and he was being tr
people, begging for money. i think you spend maybe one- third to one-half of your time asking people for money. that should not be the main objective of our job. we should be doing the job for the people instead of worrying about raising money. i do not know what the answer is. maybe limiting the terms of the campaign, i do not know what it is. you cannot limit the funding because of the first amendment. it is gone way beyond the pale. i think -- we have state representatives that are spending three-quarters of a million dollars for house in indiana. we have gone beyond where we should. >> in addition to your long service, you have been on foreign affairs. >> 30 years. >> a somewhat early association was with jesse helms. how did that alliance come together? let's start with that part of the story. >> i was always a strong anti- communists. i never liked fidel castro. i became chairman of the subcommittee on western hemisphere. i worked with some of my cuban- ileanaan friends, ke ros-lehtinen and bob menendez and we worked hard to put sanctions on castro to try to bring that regime d
about. he was not as competent a person. host: i have been here a long time and i beg to disagree. we have been focused on the same issue with president bush. much of the last month we have focused on congress and the president and the fiscal clef. our decision today was to narrow it to look at what the president needs to do as he embarks on a second term. i welcome your opinion. please fill ahead. caller: he looks into the jobs situation. my number one priority for president obama is to have him look at the jobs situation. host: thank you for the call. a story per chelating last weekend, what is known as a supplemental spending bill that will move through congress. a $60.4 billion request for disaster aid came in on friday, weighed heavily for community development's to help new york and new jersey recover from hurricane sandy. most of the focus is on the immediate recovery, it includes $13 billion as a downpayment towards longer-term payments to protect against future disaster. the question this morning is, as the president begins on his second term, john is joining us from illinois
of deductions on your taxes? caller code beg your pardon? host: do you take advantage of deductions? do you itemize? take the standard deduction? caller, i take advantage of deductions, but my point is it does not matter what you try to save, there is always a way for people to separate you from your money, no matter what you try. you can take a vantage of all kinds of deductions, taxes or any other opportunity that you can see to try to save money to try to survive and live, you know? but everyone has been -- there is just no representation. people have no one to represent them or stop these corporations from stealing your money from you. host: here is what independent says on twitter -- host: barry, it -- virginia, hello. caller: thank you for your quality program on c-span. i would suggest that the deduction that should be eliminated is an industry specific deduction. just one example would be in the oil industry. intangible drilling expense, many other industries have these. the problem is that once they get past them, they are not reviewed, they are just there for a very long time, pos
'am. >> present. >>present. >> here. >> present. i beg your pardon, mr. elector for. host: host: mr. elector. >> present. >> here. >> present. >> present. >>present. >> present. >> present. >> present. mr. secretary, all electoral members are present. >> i asked maureen o'connor, chief justice of the ohio supreme court, to come forward and administer the oath of office to the members of this electoral college. >> thank you, and a course, i asked you to stand and raise your right hand. if you will repeat after me -- i, solemnly swear, that i will support, obey, and to defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution and laws of the state over ohio, and that i will faithfully discharge the duties of my office as i shall answer on to god. congratulations. >> thank you. i will now entertain nominations for the chairman of the 53rd ohio electoral college. at this time i would glycol on wade. >> mr. secretary, i nominate chris rudford. -- redfern. >> are there any other nominations? >> i move that nominations for chairman be close. >> it has been moved that nominations for the cha
's debt been begging you heard the speaker say the word "balanced." that is a key word. let's make that even. i think once both sides get to a number that is pretty close to even, i think we're going to get a deal. host: what is happening today on the house floor? guest: for weeks now, some republicans have been saying what we need to do -- the president has been winning the p.r. campaign on this. what we need to do is pass our own bill to put pressure on the democrats. they will come in today and they will take up a measure that will extend the bush era tax cuts for a certain segment of income earners, those who make below $1 million. it stops the overall tax cuts for everybody which is something the president has been asking for. it raises rates on so-called millionaire's. that gives the president what he has been asking for, basically which is to raise taxes on people who he considers wealthy. the president has a different number in mind. the ones to raise rates on people earning more than 200 -- the ones to raise rates on people earning more than 250,000 -- he wants to raise ra
with the in the tens of your question. >> it begs the question of why that happened. clearly, no specific follow-up overtime. -- over time. i think it was a combination of factors. while 1999 is certainly close to this decade -- in the world has changed drastically, and the risks associated with that world -- we're in a much more difficult and challenging position with respect to meeting the needs to be out there and engage, and in doing so in a way that our people are very specifically secure. >> there's a specific recommendation for a 10-year program and a very significant level of funding. specifically to meet the point that admiral mullen made. >> ambassador pickering, your report was extremely critical of the performance of some individuals. these bureaus to not exist in a vacuum. they're part of a hierarchical organization known as the department of state, and each has a chain of command. there are undersecretaries and deputy secretaries. what is the highest level at the department of state for you affix responsibility for what happened in benghazi? >> we fixed it at the assistant secretar
of that trust. i have debated and reasoned, with my colleagues, and i beg you -- do not let the year end without ending sequestration. i urge passage of this measure. >> field that to the gentleman from maryland, mr. van holland. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i want to say to my friend, the chairman of the budget committees, thank you. i want to say to my friend, the chairman of the budget committee, i have great respect for him, and i hope you will not take it the wrong way, but i am glad to have you back. i look forward to working with you next year. i hope we will be able to work in a bipartisan way, starting right now. unfortunately, that does not appear to be the case. we are engaged here in the house, on this floor today, in what has become a ridiculous political stunt which will actually take us much closer as a country to going over and the fiscal cliff. we are wasting valuable time. the speaker will be engaged with the president of the united states in negotiations, read the than having walked away from these negotiations with the president. walking away is becoming a bone bat hut -- a bad
. members spend an inordinate amount of time at their headquarters calling people, begging for money. i think you spend maybe one- third to one-half of your time asking people for money. that should not be the main objective of our job. we should be doing the job for the people instead of worrying about raising money. i do not know what the answer is. maybe limiting the terms of the campaign, i do not know what it is. you cannot limit the funding because of the first amendment. it is gone way beyond the pale. i think -- we have state representatives that are spending three-quarters of a million dollars for house seat in indiana. we have gone beyond where we should. >> in addition to your long service, you have been on foreign affairs. >> 30 years. >> a somewhat early association was with jesse helms. how did that alliance come together? let's start with that part of the story. >> i was always a strong anti- communists. i never liked fidel castro. i became chairman of the subcommittee on western hemisphere. i worked with some of my cuban- american friends, ileana ros- lehtinen and bob m
would end up killing charities and forcing people to come begging, oh, please, government, would you please give me a morsel, give me another crumb? so which ever party happens to be in power gets more power. republican or democrat. and we've got to stop that cycle of dependency. we have got to help people reach their god-given potential. and so, when you hear about fair share, you want an equal percentage tax, let's have one for warren buffett and the same rate for his secretary. let's make the income tax, the corporate tax, the capital gains tax, the gift tax, the estate tax, let's just make them all 15% across the board. i'll never have a problem with estate tax. but it is outrageous to make people sell their family farm or sell a business or get in hoc up to their ears for something their parents have worked a lifetime to build up. and people like warren buffett, the ultrarich, they're not going to have to worry about the estate tax because they're able to pay megabucks for lawyers and brilliant financial analysts to come up with a way, usually involving life insurance and differ
and demanding closure of guantanamo beg for years and years but no one, and none of these do-gooder's talks about human rights in iran. where are these good people? those good people who talk about human rights in secular regimes in the middle east have totally forgotten us. i have an idea of why this is. i believe that many of them are communists. [laughter] yes,they still are even after the end of the cold war, they are communists. the only side with the enemies of the united states. they believe that the enemy of my enemy is my friends of the islamic republic of iran is critical to the united states, then they are a friend of me teaching at berkeley. just to mention one of the liberal institutions. that? [laughter] >> was pure accident. that is such a shame but use of the cold war. try to engage some of the people who showed the united states government during the cold war how to wage cultural warfare. not only the people who manage to make "dr. zhivago" to a movie. why is there no iranian "dr. zhivago?" you have to wage war against not only those who are not your enemies but opponents o
of change. 2013 is coming. we can't have the same issues. it's not supposed to be fair on everyone. so i beg you, let's try something different. [applause] >> how about the female speaker from the northwest? anybody from the northwest? yes. >> whatever we do, i try to think different -- >> your name. >> i am anthony dames friend northwest. whatever we do, trying to pick something different in so many places is difficult, especially when there's more important things to focus on. [applause] >> okay, time is slightly against us. i now need to call in order to conclude the debate from the northeast, mr. matthew wilson. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. transport has become a necessity. we use it to get educators, to get health care and to get employment. in recent years, transport it backwards. crisis have rocketed in the liability has made young people's lives are difficult. today we have heard that cost is the biggest issue for young people. statistics have shown that 16 to 18-year-olds the other transport fares are too high. to put them into context, that is more than double the populati
support systems, and it is not a new problem. it is frankly getting worse going forward. that begs the question of, yes, we need to reform the education system, particularly focusing on middle school, but we also have to recognize, as steve mentioned, one of the opportunities and challenges of the internet is that has made space and distance and time in effect disappear in terms of the change. you can build it anywhere. if you can build it anywhere, that means america has international companies with footprints everywhere, and microsoft and google and aol can choose where to locate. if they're not getting enough american talent, it will relocate. one last point, many of these younger people are still being trained at our universities. oftentimes, they're not so much going back home, many are just driving north to toronto, canada, where there is a much easier visa system. >> steve, people say the problem is not just that it cannot the talent in the u.s. but that it costs more. that this is about a less- expensive alternative. >> no, i don't think that is true. i think it is also the
with the president. not $400,000, but $250,000. it does not matter whether the president calls, begs, cries. those republicans will not agree with anything. they are going home now to their fancy homes. according to mitt romney, forget about the 47%. i am 71. my husband is 80. we will survive. the president should let all of the tax expire, all bush tax cuts, whatever it is, expire. start from scratch. we would not feel it. it is over 10 years. no matter what little we have, we will survive, and we will deal with what we have. host: we have been covering a lot of the fiscal cliff negotiations, what has been happening on the hill. we just heard from the white house, from president obama. you can go to our special page of the season and website, hamas -- our cspan website, c- span.org/fiscalcliff. we are taking your phone calls. we want to see what to think about the remarks from the president and what has been happening on capitol hill. the numbers are on your screen. we go to arizona, the republicans line. caller: i think what is happening is that these congressmen, no matter whether republican or
. i debated and reasoned with my colleagues and now i beg you, do not let the year end without ending sequestration. i urge passage of this measure. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from maryland, mr. van hollen. mr. van hollen: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to say to my friend the chairman of the budget committee, is the mike on? thank you. thank you, mr. speaker. the -- at the outset i want to say to my fend the chairman of the budget committee, i have great respect for him and i hope he won't take it toe wrong way but i'm glad to have you back and look forward to actually working with you next year. i actually hope that we'll be able to work in a bipartisan way starting right now, unfortunately, that doesn't appear to be the case and we are engaged here in the house on this floor today in what has become a ridiculous political stunt which will take us much closer as a country to going over the fiscal cliff. we're wasting valuable time. the speaker should be engaged with the president of the united states in negotiations rather than having walked aw
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)